• Jackson Pollock

    "Today painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. Most modern painters work from a different source. They work from within." -Jackson Pollock

    Pourtant, de 1951 à 1956, date de sa mort accidentelle, "Jackson Pollock avait réalisé de nombreux travaux sur papier, à l'encre de Chine, aux encres de couleurs ou à l'aquarelle. Il apparaissait évident que l'artiste s'y écartait de son "style" reconnu - le dripping - (...) qu'il s'y aventurait à nouveau d'un côté qu'il avait délaissé depuis plus d'une décennie, celui d'un rapport moins distant au paysage et à la nature." (Philippe Dagen, dans "Zao Wou-Ki, l'encre, l'eau, l'air, la couleur")

    Jackson Pollock

     Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) 
    Untitled 
    gouache, ink and paper collage laid down on board 
    15 7/8 x 21 in. (40.3 x 53.3 cm.) 
    Painted circa 1943. 

    Jackson Pollock

    Date: ca. 1948–49Medium: Dripped ink and enamel on paper
    Dimensions: H. 22-3/8, W. 30 inches (56.8 x 76.2 cm.)
    Classification: Drawings Credit Line: Gift of Lee Krasner Pollock, 1982 

     

     

    Jackson Pollock


    Untitled,  
    1951.  
    noir et encre de couleur sur papier japonais,  
    25 x 38 3/4 pouces (63,5 x 99,4 cm).  
    Musée d'Art Moderne, cadeaux de New York de Lee Krasner
    dans la mémoire de Jackson Pollock ..  

     

    D'autres œuvres sur papier sur ce lien.

    Et bien sûr, ses œuvres à l'huile :

    Jackson Pollock

    Convergences
    Oil on canvas; 93.5 x 155" 1952

     

    Jackson Pollock

    The deep

    Jackson Pollock

    Blue poles (or n° 11)

    Jackson Pollock

    Jackson Pollock

     

    Jackson Pollock

    Lavender mist

    "Pollock's method was based on his earlier experiments with dripping and splattering paint on ceramic, glass, and canvas on an easel. Now, he laid a large canvas on the floor of his studio barn, nearly covering the space. Using house paint, he dripped, poured, and flung pigment from loaded brushes and sticks while walking around it. He said that this was his way of being "in" his work, acting as a medium in the creative process. For Pollock, who admired the sand painting of the American Indians, summoning webs of color to his canvases and making them balanced, complete, and lyrical, was almost an act of ritual. Like an ancient cave painter, he "signed" Lavender Mist in the upper left corner and at the top of the canvas with his handprints."

     Jackson Pollock

    Jackson Pollock

    "On the floor I am more at ease. I feel nearer, more part of the painting, since this way I can 
    walk around it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting. ”

    -Jackson Pollock

    Jackson Pollock

    Jackson Pollock

    Jackson Pollock

     Site : http://www.jackson-pollock.org/index.jsp